TOPIC: Mental Health Treatment Plan

TOPIC: Mental Health Treatment Plan

SUBJECT: Psychology

DESCRIPTION:
Scenario: You are a Clinical Mental Health Counselor working in a Community Mental Health Agency. You are currently seeing Brigitte, an 18-year old adopted Native American female who is accompanied to a therapy session by her mother, Elizabeth, who is European American. Brigitte was a senior at the public high school but has recently stopped attending school. Elizabeth met her husband, who is Israeli, 13 years ago while visiting Israel. After living in Israel for five years, Elizabeth and her husband moved to the United States and adopted Brigitte when she was 11-years old. Elizabeth reported that she filed for divorce from her husband eight months ago after he was caught having an affair. Elizabeth speaks softly and sobs throughout the session as she describes how distraught she is by “my daughter’s behaviors”, which began happening one year ago. According to Elizabeth, Brigitte has been stealing and acting oppositional and defiant towards authority figures. For example, Brigitte continually yells at her adoptive parents, teachers, and her boss at work. After working at a local clothing store for two years, Brigitte was fired from her job six months ago for being combative with her boss. Brigitte also recently got into a physical altercation with a classmate. In addition, Brigitte has been experiencing difficulties falling asleep, reports having nightmares, and appears to be nervous most of the time. Elizabeth describes Bridgette as irritable, “always on edge”, and lethargic for most of the day (or she often sleeps through the day unless she has school or work). Elizabeth is particularly worried that now that Brigitte no longer has a job or school to attend, she will become even less productive. When you ask for Brigitte’s input, she rolls her eyes and sighs, but she also reports that there is “some truth to what my mom says”. Brigitte reports that she dropped out of school recently because her grades had dropped so significantly and she no longer had a desire to go to college. She states that she was an “A” student but over the last year struggled to maintain passing scores. Brigitte reports she has also been isolating herself from friends and fellow classmates. She describes herself as a very social and outgoing person who always maintained many friendships; however, recently she has isolated herself and withdrawn from any social activity. She describes spending most of her evenings at home watching TV. She states she feel hopeless in terms of what her direction her life is going – particularly her career options. Her mother expresses significant concern about her future, particularly getting another job, and states she wants to support Brigitte financially but because of the pending divorce is unable to do so. Brigitte’s mother also mentions not knowing for how long she will be able to pay for sessions as her husband has “nearly stopped” giving her money. She stated, “I have to constantly beg him to help us pay for our food.” Elizabeth also reports that all their belongings, including the company they owned, the home, and the bank accounts, were moved by her husband to his brother’s name. Elizabeth states, “as a result, I have nothing left in this world except our child…The lawyer told me that in all likelihood I won’t get anything…especially since Brigitte is an adult.” Brigitte denies suffering from any medical conditions, or having been hospitalized for any mental health or physiological issues. Brigitte also denies drinking alcohol or engaging in recreational drug use. During the session Brigitte was alert to person, place, and time. Her speech was coherent, although at times there was incongruence between the content of what was spoken and her affect. Bridgette did not endorse any suicidal or homicidal ideation. Directions: Please compose a well-written and organized 6 – 8 page essay in response to the following questions. Use the most current APA Style, write clearly and concisely, cite appropriate and current literature (empirical and/or theoretical), and be sure to demonstrate your multicultural and ethical competence. Assessment: Identify the assessments you would conduct to enhance your understanding of Brigitte’s problems and explain how they would direct your diagnostic formation. Be sure to include at least one career assessment. Diagnosis: Develop a provisional diagnosis– Give a DSM diagnosis. Clarify your diagnostic considerations by indicating why you are considering these possible diagnoses, using specific evidence from the vignette. Theoretical conceptualization: Describe and apply a specific counseling theory that you would use to conceptualize the case example. Include a brief description and primary concepts of the theory. Using your selected theory, provide a theoretically grounded case conceptualization for the client (i.e., explain the client’s background and presenting concerns in the context of the required theoretical framework). Theoretically Grounded Treatment Planning: Using the treatment plan template below, develop a brief therapeutic treatment plan for the client based upon your theoretical conceptualization above (e.g., two measurable goals for treatment and corresponding objectives and interventions). Please make sure the treatment plan is consistent with the theory you identified above. Be sure that the treatment plan addresses career planning and vocational goals, in addition to other primary concerns you have identified. Ethics and Diversity: Identify the ethical and/or legal dilemmas introduced in this vignette. Given the client’s ethnicity and background, explain what factors or cultural considerations you would take into account in rendering diagnoses, case conceptualization, and treatment planning. Your response should provide empirical evidence with appropriate citations to support your choice of assessments, diagnosis, theoretical framework and the treatment plan that you are recommending for use with this client. Make sure you write in a clear, concise, and organized manner; demonstrate ethical scholarship in accurate representation and attribution of sources; display accurate spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

Design your own working memory test by creating a list of items

TOPIC: PS 200 DIS 4

SUBJECT: Psychology

TYPE: Essay

DESCRIPTION:
Design your own working memory test by creating a list of items (it can be anything you like such as digits or words) and test someone’s working memory using your list. Alternatively, you can ask someone else to create a list of items and test your working memory. Discuss the working memory task you used and the results you obtained. Provide a real-world scenario when you might use your working memory. Remember to support your discussion of working memory with information from the unit’s Readings

Mean Creek (2004) R

TOPIC: Outline

SUBJECT: Psychology

DESCRIPTION:
Mean Creek (2004) R | 90 min | Crime, Drama 7.3 Rate this 12345678910 7.3/10 X 74 Metascore When a teen is bullied, his brother and friends lure the bully into the woods to seek revenge. Director: Jacob Estes | Stars: Rory Culkin, Ryan Kelley, Scott Mechlowicz, Trevor Morgan must make it related on theories of law of PSY EXAMPLE of Outline Psychology Writing Center How to Make an Outline What is an Outline? An outline is a formal system used to think about and organize your paper. For example, you can use it to see whether your ideas connect to each other, what order of ideas works best, or whether you have sufficient evidence to support each of your points. Outlines can be useful for any paper to help you see the overall picture. There are two kinds of outlines: the topic outline and the sentence outline. • The topic outline consists of short phrases. It is particularly useful when you are dealing with a number of different issues that could be arranged in a variety of ways in your paper. • The sentence outline is done in full sentences. It is normally used when your paper focuses on complex details. The sentence outline is especially useful for this kind of paper because sentences themselves have many of the details in them. A sentence outline also allows you to include those details in the sentences instead of having to create an outline of many short phrases that goes on page after page. Both topic and sentence outlines follow rigid formats, using Roman and Arabic numerals along with capital and small letters of the alphabet. This helps both you and anyone who reads your outline to follow your organization easily. This is the kind of outline most commonly used for classroom papers and speeches (see the example at the end of this paper). There is no rule for which type of outline is best. Choose the one that you think works best for your paper. Make the Outline 1. Identify the topic. The topic of your paper is important. Try to sum up the point of your paper in one sentence or phrase. This will help your paper stay focused on the main point. 2. Identify the main categories. What main points will you cover? The introduction usually introduces all of your main points, then the rest of paper can be spent developing those points. 3. Create the first category. What is the first point you want to cover? If the paper centers around a complicated term, a definition is often a good place to start. For a paper about a particular theory, giving the general background on the theory can be a good place to begin. 4. Create subcategories. After you have the main point, create points under it that provide support for the main point. The number of categories that you use depends on the amount of information that you are going to cover; there is no right or wrong number to use. By convention, each category consists of a minimum of two entries. If your first category is Roman numeral I, your outline must also have a category labeled roman numeral II; if you have a capital letter A under category I, you must also have a capital letter B. Whether you then go on to have capital letters C, D, E, etc., is up to you, depending on the amount of material you are going to cover. You are required to have only two of each numbered or lettered category. Copyright 1997, University of Washington outline.pdf Box 351525 psywc@uw.edu (206) 685-8278 University of Washington Psychology Writing Center http://www.psych.uw.edu/psych.php#p=339 The completed outline could look like this: Television and Children’s Violence I. Introduction A. Does television cause violence? 1. Brief mention of previous areas of research 2. Identify causation dilemma B. Present studies on both sides 1. Some studies are “for” 2. Some studies are “against” C. After weighing evidence it appears that TV does not cause violence II. Research “For” A. First study “for” 1. Method 2. Results 3. Analysis of their conclusions a. insufficient sample size b. but representative sample B. Second study “for” 1. Method 2. Results 3. Analysis of their conclusions a. faulty instructions b. poor control group III. Research “Against” Copyright 1997, University of Washington Box 351525 psywc@uw.edu (206) 685-8278 outline.pdf University of Washington Psychology Writing Center http://www.psych.uw.edu/psych.php#p=339 A. Study “against” 1. Method 2. Results 3. Analysis of their conclusions a. Perfect controls b. No unwarranted generalizations B. Second study “against” 1. Method 2. Results 3. Analysis of their conclusions a. Large sample size b. Real world setting c. But typical problems with external validity IV. Conclusion A. Studies “for” all have poor methodology B. Studies “against” all have good methodology C. Research doesn’t support that TV causes violence D. More research needed Keep Your Outline Flexible Box 351525 psywc@uw.edu (206) 685-8278 Although the format of an outline is rigid, it shouldn’t make you inflexible about how to write your paper. Often when you start writing, especially about a subject that you don’t know well, the paper takes new directions. If your paper changes direction, or you add new sections, then feel free to change the outline– just as you would make corrections on a crude map as you become more familiar with the terrain you are exploring. Major reorganizations are not uncommon; your outline will help you stay organized and focused. However, when your paper diverges from your outline, it can also mean that you have lost your focus, and hence the structure of your paper. How do you know whether to change the paper to fit the outline or change the outline to fit the paper? A good way to check yourself is to use the paper to recreate the Copyright 1997, University of Washington outline.pdf University of Washington Psychology Writing Center http://www.psych.uw.edu/psych.php#p=339 Box 351525 psywc@uw.edu (206) 685-8278 outline. This is extremely useful for checking the organization of the paper. If the resulting outline says what you want it to say in an order that is easy to follow, the organization of your paper has been successful. If you discover that it’s difficult to create an outline from what you have written, then you need to revise the paper. Your outline can help you with this, because the problems in the outline will show you where the paper has become disorganized.

TOPIC: Human Development

TOPIC: Human Development

SUBJECT: Psychology

TYPE: Research Paper

DESCRIPTION:
Observe or interview a child or adult in the age range of interest to you. You should have observed or conducted an interview at least three times during the duration of this course. The person you observed or interviewed should not be a family member. Each observation or interview should have lasted 30-45 minutes. In 1,000-1,250 words, including the following in your case study. Give a brief physical description of the person observed. (Someone in middle-adulthood) Discuss the cognitive, social, moral, and emotional development of the person observed, using concepts and terms studied in this course. The Developmental Milestone Chart that has been created during this course will help in the completion of this assignment. Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required. This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion. You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin. Please refer to the directions in the Student Success Center. This benchmark assignment assesses the following programmatic competencies: 1.3: Describe applications of psychology. Please use the textbook as a reference. Belsky-Experiencing Lifespan

TOPIC: Chart of developmental milestones

TOPIC: Chart of developmental milestones

SUBJECT: Psychology

DESCRIPTION:
I do not know how many words the assignment needs to be. So, please be aware of that. Construct a chart (or a visual of your choosing, Word table, Excel chart, etc.) of age-related developmental milestones. Theorists who MUST be included at each appropriate age level are Piaget, Kohlberg, Bandura, Vygotsky, Erikson, Mahler, and Jung. Other theorist of your choosing should also be included (minimum of three). Your visual should include: Describe the essential developmental features of each age category. Discuss concerns or issues pertinent to each age category. NOTE: Place more emphasis on the age group with which you work or aspire to work. Use four to six scholarly resources with an APA-formatted reference page. (Middle-Adulthood) While APA style is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected, and documentation of sources should be presented using APA formatting guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion. You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin. Please refer to the directions in the Student Success Center. This benchmark assignment assesses the following programmatic competencies: 1.1: Describe key historical perspectives and theories in psychology and 1.2: Differentiate among current perspectives and theories in psychology.

TOPIC: Bipolar depression

TOPIC: Bipolar depression

SUBJECT: Psychology

TYPE: Essay

DESCRIPTION:
Bipolar depression is a particularly difficult disorder to recognize because most people do not realize they periodically exhibit mania. In fact, since increased confidence and elevated mood are symptoms of this phase, it is rare for a person to seek care when manic. Discuss how psychologists might screen potential sufferers of this disorder. Keep in mind that most of these patients coming to a mental health provider tend to report symptoms of depression (i.e., in their depressed phase), anxiety and agitation (hypomanic episode), or may seem psychotic (severe manic episode).

TOPIC: Community development

TOPIC: Community development

SUBJECT: Psychology

TYPE: Essay

DESCRIPTION:
These are the only instructions : Discussion Question #2 Defining Community; the Community Development and Action Process A community is described as ‘any group sharing something in common’. It could be a location, an experience, a tradition, an interest. The community can be viewed as the ‘teacher’ and you as the ‘student’. In the community you work/volunteer or are studying to work with, what have you learned from your ‘teacher’.

TOPIC: Motivational Theories that Relate to Fam

TOPIC: Motivational Theories that Relate to Fam

SUBJECT: Psychology

TYPE: Essay

DESCRIPTION:
How do family dynamics and parenting relate to students motivation using the following motivational theories: expectancy value theory, attribution theory and achievement theory. Your response should:  Identify and provide an overview of research related to the question  State a central premise or main point  Present a logical conceptual argument linking your conclusions to the research literature. Please use at least two articles from each theory. I have uploaded the documents for your review.